Frittata di Spaghetti

frittataToday must have been one of the craziest versions of the Frittata di Spaghetti I’ve made so far. La frittata is one of my favourite Italian recipes because you can throw in nearly anything you’ve got left at the bottom of your fridge. I also hate to throw food away and this recipe allows you to be creative with leftover pasta. I’ve never had a bad result with this as long as I’ve remembered to season well.

Today I was inspired by spelt spaghetti as my daughter’s eczema is getting worse as the winter season intensifies. I’ve decided to leave not only white sugar but also white flours off her diet as they are highly acidic and with nearly no nutritional value.

The basic recipe is for 500g spaghetti, 6 eggs, parmesan cheese and salsa, the Italian tomato sauce. If I was to cook that much pasta with salsa I would use two tins but you only need one for the frittata.

Cook the spaghetti to very al dente and rinse under cold water. Prepare the salsa by heating olive oil and add chopped garlic as much as you think is best. I usually use one big clove. Once the garlic is fried, add one tin of chopped tomatoes. Add ½ tin of water and reduce to half. Season with Himalayan rock salt, pepper and parsley or basil.

Mix spaghetti in a bowl with 6 beaten eggs and a cup of grated parmesan cheese. Add salt to taste. Mix in the salsa and pour the mixture into a large frying pan with 1,5 tablespoons of ghee. Keep under low fire for 20 – 30 minutes until the frittata is ready for turning. That done, fry for another 10 to 15 minutes.

You can add anything you like in the mixture before you cook it. Usually I add olives, capers and chunks of leftover cheese. This time I fried two fillets of anchovies in the ghee, then sautéed an onion and added in them the spaghetti and egg mixture. I also added the capers I found at the bottom of two different jars and some cheddar cheese. Good old Italians might turn in their graves before combining fish and cheese but never mind, I was happy with it. This is great seasonal food and I managed to make good home economy by using leftovers and preparing a meal that will last me for the next three days, at least.

Re image, yes, I have no qualifications of a food stylist.

 

Rules for sensible eating

sheknowsHave you ever noticed that after finishing a plate of food you actually didn’t taste much of what you ate? Did it go down with such speed and volume that the only thing to stop you eating more was the stomach stretching to levels that started hurting? Yes, I’ve done that too. Many times. What used to happen after hurrying back home from work with an empty stomach is not something I want to share here, but my point is that when stressed, you make wrong decisions. This is the number one rule of sensible eating: you should be relaxed when you start your meal.

What and how you eat is incredibly important and often how is even more important than what. Even the healthiest foods can become toxic if you eat them in a wrong way, be that too much, too fast or eaten in a wrong combination. If you have a plateful of raw spinach that you firstly don’t want to eat because it has no salt or butter on it, your salivary glands don’t excrete enough saliva. Your digestive power goes down when you have no appetite for what’s on your plate. Then, the enzymes in your stomach do not work well because you haven’t secreted enough saliva, and whatever happens thereafter in your gut is not something to brag about (but it has something to do with toxins). So this then is rule number two of sensible eating: make sure your food is appetising.

You also have to make sure you have understood if your need to eat is because you are actually hungry and not just because you have an appetite. Rule number three consists of making sure you don’t eat before you’ve digested your previous meal. There is however (& hooray), a trick you can try to test this. When you get a craving have half a glass of warm water. If this makes you burp, you have not fully digested yet and should wait until the previous meal has left the bottom of your stomach.

These are a few helpful practical tips for your everyday life. If you are interested in knowing more, come for a health consultation at our centre. When you book, remember to mention this article and you’ll get a 15% discount on your first session, or if you prefer to book online, simply use the promocode “toxinfree”.