Just chew

chewAwareness in action is what makes life tasteful. If we only cultivated this ability a bit more we would live our lives much happier and healthier. Awareness means to stay in the present, enjoy the moment in all its flavours. When awareness is lost we either worry about future or delve in the past. Or, we’re multitasking, like watching TV whilst eating.

What’s wrong with multitasking? It messes up with your concentration. Things are best done with, yes, full awareness, especially eating. What’s wrong about TV dinners is that the television takes priority. It takes priority from what should be one of the most important things in our lives. Instead, we have started considering eating as something secondary, something we can do whilst carrying out work by the computer, on the go, whilst driving.

The idea that food is a commodity of second order has had tremendous consequences on our health. Obesity, late onset diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and certain cancers are directly related to faulty eating habits. If we only sat down and ate with awareness we would experience a drastic drop in the occurrences of these conditions.

So why is it bad to concentrate on something else whilst eating? It is because our brains, when engaged in eating prevent us from sending food down without proper chewing. The process of chewing becomes much longer and this has amazing benefits in terms of digestion.

When our minds are on the TV screen the food is able to pass down to the stomach only after two bites. Incompletely chewed food is very hard to digest and causes bloating, gas, acidity and other digestive issues. But, if we chew properly the stomach and the enzymes in it are able to process the well-chewed bulk easily. Why? Because of the mechanical break down and mixing of saliva. Saliva has enzymes that are necessary to digest carbohydrates. Most digestive problems with bread and wheat products are due to not chewing properly and not mixing enough saliva in them. Gluten is a hard to digest protein and if it has been let to bypass the first phase of digestion i.e. chewing it becomes even harder, if not impossible to digest.

To prove I’m right about chewing and eating with awareness, try eating with your eyes closed. This way the brain is directed to survey the full eating process. You’ll notice that it is virtually impossible to send food down without it being well chewed. You will also notice that you eat less. Proper chewing makes you feel satisfied faster. Also, when the brain monitors how much volume and nutrients go down it will turn your appetite off when you’ve had enough. Even if you had the tastiest food on your plate you just don’t have the taste sensation anymore to enjoy it. Try this trick and see what the right consistency of the food should be and what is the ideal portion size for you.

Every process that starts well is easy. When the foundations are laid well you need less effort for the rest. So it is with digestion as well. If you chew properly you should be able to avoid overeating, make sure you absorb all the nutrients and eliminate the waste in a satisfying manner. Once this is happening you notice not only that you are physically healthier but also, you enjoy higher levels of concentration and awareness.

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How you eat your food can resolve your gluten intolerance

wheatIn my practice I often, in fact more and more, meet people who have very negative thoughts about gluten. Some of them have real problems with it. Although I am actually of the opinion that gluten should or at least can be in our diet I do respect the fact that many of us have problems in digesting it and that some people really have serious issues like celiac disease.

Faulty digestion is usually the problem behind gluten intolerance. Digestive problems can originate from faulty eating habits or psychological issues. If our digestive system worked properly and we ate gluten in a reasonable manner we should be able to digest it. No bloating, no gas, nor digestive complains should arise.

Most of the times the digestive problems are due to how we consume our food. The way we eat is often more important than what we eat. Gluten intolerance is usually a consequence of years of bad eating habits. The food itself might have been nominally healthy but the way it has been consumed has deteriorated the gut environment and caused a reactive intestinal lining where hard to digest items are not processed to satisfaction.

The good news is that once gluten intolerance is spotted it doesn’t necessarily mean that gluten is to be totally avoided henceforth. The thing to do is to clear the GI-tract from toxic sludge and enhance digestive capacity and the bacterial balance. Sooner or later it should be possible to re-introduce gluten in the diet without any digestive complaints.

Personally I would still advice anyone to stay away from white wheat flour. It provides empty calories i.e. doesn’t have much of a nutritional content and is highly glutinous. Still, an occasional intake of this shouldn’t be a problem once the digestive fire is burning strongly and steadily.

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Revolution starts from the dinner table

revolutionRussell Brand calls for revolution. I agree, it is high time, and hopefully not too late for us to take action. But, the question is in the air: how and where do we start a revolution, especially if you don’t have time to go and march in the streets? You can do your own little bit but what effect does that have on a large scale? Unfortunately, most of us don’t have the luxury of a world wide influence like our Mr Brand, and we are easily left feeling helpless in front of a world full of inequalities and injustice.

The matter of fact is that if we do take action, even if it feels insignificant in front of the large scale problems, we take part in the process and it is exactly what a positive revolution should try to achieve: increasing the awareness of individual women, men and children to make wise choices about the health of the planet, it’s economy and their own peace of mind.

So where do we start increasing awareness? This task sounds almost mysterious. As if we’d need to go and find other realms of consciousness within our normal daily life. Not at all. It only means paying attention on what we do and the choices we make. And, you can start from the most basic activities of your day: choosing the right kind of food for your meals and eating it with full concentration.

  • Eat in a peaceful state of mind
  • Avoid media and intense conversation whilst eating
  • Chew properly
  • Don’t drink during meals
  • Eat one meal a day with eyes closed

The beauty of this practice of increasing awareness in eating is that the awareness starts expanding to other areas of life. Once you start and notice the results you won’t be able to stop it to influence all the activities. You just need to start from somewhere and I can’t find anything better than eating.

Eating with full awareness not only makes us more conscious of the quality of food we consume. That drives us to make wiser decisions when shopping. Focused eating also helps our digestive systems to process the food better thus enhancing the overall functioning of the GI-tract. Once our gut works well it has a beneficial effect on our minds. The gut health is directly related to our state of mind. Good gut health means better cognitive functions. Once we have achieved a positive and enthusiastic mind we are more inspired to make the small changes which eventually result in big changes.

It all comes to making right choices. Wise choices are made by a clear mind. A clear mind is devoid of mental mucous which develops if our digestive systems are not working properly. Clear digestive systems are at the basis of proper functioning of our bodies and minds. When we nourish them with proper food we are already taking part in the change the planet needs us to make. Therefore

  • Eat with awareness
  • Choose organic
  • Reduce meat eating to two times a week or become a vegetarian
  • Cook from scratch
  • Eat seasonal food
  • Avoid anything processed (even organic food can be highly processed)
  • Avoid wrapped food as much as possible
  • Avoid multinational brands
  • Shop locally
  • Use social media to spread the word

Spread the word through social media. Often considered a necessary bad but I think now it is time to harness this resource to its fullest capacity. Social media gives us a chance to communicate and not feel alone with our big and small attempts to create a better world. Social media can bind a large crowd together to stand against the disproportionate forces of economy that rule the world. It makes you feel that you are contributing to a common cause.

Start the revolution from your dinner table. Make choices that will encourage your local environment and businesses to thrive. Together they can form close nit communities where people can help each other to be more self sufficient and less dependent on corporations and the forces of economy directed from far and away. All you need to do is start taking care of the quality of your food and how you consume it.

 

Rules for sensible eating

sheknowsHave you ever noticed that after finishing a plate of food you actually didn’t taste much of what you ate? Did it go down with such speed and volume that the only thing to stop you eating more was the stomach stretching to levels that started hurting? Yes, I’ve done that too. Many times. What used to happen after hurrying back home from work with an empty stomach is not something I want to share here, but my point is that when stressed, you make wrong decisions. This is the number one rule of sensible eating: you should be relaxed when you start your meal.

What and how you eat is incredibly important and often how is even more important than what. Even the healthiest foods can become toxic if you eat them in a wrong way, be that too much, too fast or eaten in a wrong combination. If you have a plateful of raw spinach that you firstly don’t want to eat because it has no salt or butter on it, your salivary glands don’t excrete enough saliva. Your digestive power goes down when you have no appetite for what’s on your plate. Then, the enzymes in your stomach do not work well because you haven’t secreted enough saliva, and whatever happens thereafter in your gut is not something to brag about (but it has something to do with toxins). So this then is rule number two of sensible eating: make sure your food is appetising.

You also have to make sure you have understood if your need to eat is because you are actually hungry and not just because you have an appetite. Rule number three consists of making sure you don’t eat before you’ve digested your previous meal. There is however (& hooray), a trick you can try to test this. When you get a craving have half a glass of warm water. If this makes you burp, you have not fully digested yet and should wait until the previous meal has left the bottom of your stomach.

These are a few helpful practical tips for your everyday life. If you are interested in knowing more, come for a health consultation at our centre. When you book, remember to mention this article and you’ll get a 15% discount on your first session, or if you prefer to book online, simply use the promocode “toxinfree”.