Unconventional mascarpone risotto with oven roasted vegetables and beet greens

Risotto

Two nights ago I roasted vegetables for supper. I had to deal with a load of them left from my weekly delivery. What was left over, I pureed with the intention to prepare a nice wintery soup for the following day at work. But as it happened, in the fury of preparing for the day, I fell short of time. In the evening I took the pure out and noticed I had a bunch of wilting beet greens that badly needed cooking. I remembered an amazing risotto I had once eaten in a restaurant in Queen’s Park with pumpkin and spinach and came with an idea. I’ll mix the roasted veggie pure in the risotto and add the beet greens to balance the sweetness.

I haven’t cooked risotto for a long time because of the white rice. I don’t keep white items in my cupboard anymore. Table salt, white sugar, flour and rice are what they now call anti-nutrients. I didn’t have brown Arborio rice so I had to use plain brown rice. For risotto enthusiast this might be a big transgression but I thought I’d break the rules and try and, oh boy, did it work! The sweet and earthy flavours of the rice, roasted root vegetables and mascarpone combined with the bitterness of greens made such a great combination that I could not help but to share this with you. So, here it goes:

P.s. I warn you, this is not a conventional way of cooking the risotto because the rice is different. I also won’t be able to give you an exact recipe because I worked with my gut feelings. I can only guess these were the measures:

200ml brown rice

Water

1 tsp vegetable bouillon powder

Ghee

1 large onion

1dl white wine

2 tbsp mascarpone cheese

200ml roasted vegetable pure’

(I used: potatoes, carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes and garlic)

Bunch of beet greens

parmesan cheese

salt

pepper

Olive oil

Cook the rice in water with bouillon powder until tender. Pure’ roasted vegetables with some warm water in a blender. Chop the beet greens and fry them gently in a small amount of ghee until soft and season with salt. Finely chop the onion and, in a separate pan, fry in ghee until golden and tender. Add the rice and wine and let cook for a few minutes. Add mascarpone and let it melt in the rice. Add vegetable pure and mix well. Mix beet greens in and season with salt and pepper. Add a little grated parmesan cheese but not to overpower the taste of other ingredients. When serving garnish with olive oil.

Raw Coconut chutney

Coconut chutneyIt’s late summer and to celebrate it here’s the last of my seasons recipes. This brings me back to the days I was studying in India. We always dined at my teacher’s house and ate heavenly. Here’s one recipe from Nani, the grandmother. She shared her recipes gladly and we were eager to learn. Here’s one of them. It’s the good old coconut chutney. Obviously you can have it as a condiment for your meal but in India we often had it as a main with chapatis, freshly made and dripping with home made ghee. Here in London I like to use buckwheat flour to make the flatbread. You can find the recipe in my previous blog post of “Buckwheat flatbread with spinach and ricotta filling”.

Ideally you would use a fresh coconut but I just use the dry grated one and soak it in coconut milk (or cream if I want to be decadent). Mix all ingredients together and let soak for a few hours before enjoying. As for quantities of ingredients, all I can say, play it by ear or by your palate.

Grated coconut soaked in raw coconut milk/cream

Finely chopped fresh green chillies

Salt

Chopped fresh coriander

Curry leaves

Cumin seeds

Garlic

Come and buy come ingredients from our shop like the organic coconut flakes and milk. We also now stock 100% raw coconut milky Rhythm.

 

Hungry after your meals?

Hungry again

Have you ever thought why you feel hungry in the morning after having enjoyed a heavy meal in the evening? Or, have you ever wondered why you feel peckish only after an hour of your lunch?You would think that your body was satisfied for a little while but you still are craving for food. There is a simple explanation to this: you have not absorbed what you have eaten.

If you do not absorb you do not get the nourishment and energy you need. And then, you start craving more food, even if you still have food sitting in your stomach.

This is one of the most common reasons people have digestive and weight management problems. And of course, why we have cravings as well. When we eat at the wrong time or consume too much food at one sitting our digestive process is likely to slow down or stop all together.

Imagine yourself having a heavy meal and going to sleep before it’s been digested. At night the body should concentrate on other things other than digestion and having new food in the stomach confuses the body clock. Because of this the food can stay in your stomach for a long time and be only partially absorbed to your system. For this you might still get a taste of your evening meal in your mouth in the morning. And, because you haven’t absorbed you will feel hungry and crave for sugar and carbohydrates especially.

The same can happen after lunch. If you have eaten too much, too quickly, concentrating on anything else other than eating your digestive process will be in danger. Consequently your food just sits in your tummy causing gas and/or bloating. Nothing is absorbed and when that happens you get afternoon cravings. Sugar and carbohydrates become suddenly very attractive and hard to resist. This is because the brain uses them for energy and they can release it very fast.

For you to avoid these scenarios make sure you eat with awareness, slow down, chew well, take a break to eat, do not wash your meals down with a drink and make sure you are not eating bland food. Make is tasty; you need to satisfy your taste buds as well.

If you want to get to grips with your own digestion book for a consultation here.

Frittata di Spaghetti

frittataToday must have been one of the craziest versions of the Frittata di Spaghetti I’ve made so far. La frittata is one of my favourite Italian recipes because you can throw in nearly anything you’ve got left at the bottom of your fridge. I also hate to throw food away and this recipe allows you to be creative with leftover pasta. I’ve never had a bad result with this as long as I’ve remembered to season well.

Today I was inspired by spelt spaghetti as my daughter’s eczema is getting worse as the winter season intensifies. I’ve decided to leave not only white sugar but also white flours off her diet as they are highly acidic and with nearly no nutritional value.

The basic recipe is for 500g spaghetti, 6 eggs, parmesan cheese and salsa, the Italian tomato sauce. If I was to cook that much pasta with salsa I would use two tins but you only need one for the frittata.

Cook the spaghetti to very al dente and rinse under cold water. Prepare the salsa by heating olive oil and add chopped garlic as much as you think is best. I usually use one big clove. Once the garlic is fried, add one tin of chopped tomatoes. Add ½ tin of water and reduce to half. Season with Himalayan rock salt, pepper and parsley or basil.

Mix spaghetti in a bowl with 6 beaten eggs and a cup of grated parmesan cheese. Add salt to taste. Mix in the salsa and pour the mixture into a large frying pan with 1,5 tablespoons of ghee. Keep under low fire for 20 – 30 minutes until the frittata is ready for turning. That done, fry for another 10 to 15 minutes.

You can add anything you like in the mixture before you cook it. Usually I add olives, capers and chunks of leftover cheese. This time I fried two fillets of anchovies in the ghee, then sautéed an onion and added in them the spaghetti and egg mixture. I also added the capers I found at the bottom of two different jars and some cheddar cheese. Good old Italians might turn in their graves before combining fish and cheese but never mind, I was happy with it. This is great seasonal food and I managed to make good home economy by using leftovers and preparing a meal that will last me for the next three days, at least.

Re image, yes, I have no qualifications of a food stylist.

 

Rules for sensible eating

sheknowsHave you ever noticed that after finishing a plate of food you actually didn’t taste much of what you ate? Did it go down with such speed and volume that the only thing to stop you eating more was the stomach stretching to levels that started hurting? Yes, I’ve done that too. Many times. What used to happen after hurrying back home from work with an empty stomach is not something I want to share here, but my point is that when stressed, you make wrong decisions. This is the number one rule of sensible eating: you should be relaxed when you start your meal.

What and how you eat is incredibly important and often how is even more important than what. Even the healthiest foods can become toxic if you eat them in a wrong way, be that too much, too fast or eaten in a wrong combination. If you have a plateful of raw spinach that you firstly don’t want to eat because it has no salt or butter on it, your salivary glands don’t excrete enough saliva. Your digestive power goes down when you have no appetite for what’s on your plate. Then, the enzymes in your stomach do not work well because you haven’t secreted enough saliva, and whatever happens thereafter in your gut is not something to brag about (but it has something to do with toxins). So this then is rule number two of sensible eating: make sure your food is appetising.

You also have to make sure you have understood if your need to eat is because you are actually hungry and not just because you have an appetite. Rule number three consists of making sure you don’t eat before you’ve digested your previous meal. There is however (& hooray), a trick you can try to test this. When you get a craving have half a glass of warm water. If this makes you burp, you have not fully digested yet and should wait until the previous meal has left the bottom of your stomach.

These are a few helpful practical tips for your everyday life. If you are interested in knowing more, come for a health consultation at our centre. When you book, remember to mention this article and you’ll get a 15% discount on your first session, or if you prefer to book online, simply use the promocode “toxinfree”.